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CURRENT TRENDS AND CONCERNS IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES

9783030369651 ::  CURRENT TRENDS AND CONCERNS IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES
ISBN:

9783030369651

Colección:EMERGING INFECTIOUS DISEASES OF THE 21ST CENTURY
EditorialSPRINGER NATURE
Edicion:
Páginas:329
Idioma:INGLES
Oferta estudiantes
P.V.P.: 169,99 € + 4% IVA = 176,79 €
Dto 5% Ahorras 8,84 €
Importe final iva incl. 167,95 €
PLAZO DE ENTREGA 15 DIAS

A FOLLOW-UP TO&NBSP;<I>EMERGING ISSUES AND CONTROVERSIES IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES</I>, THIS VOLUME PROVIDES A COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF TOPICAL ISSUES IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES, HIGHLIGHTING THE CONTROVERSIES RELATED TO THE NEWEST FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS. COVERAGE INCLUDES TRENDS AND DEBATES IN HIV RESEARCH, COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA,&NBSP;<I>H. PYLORI</I>, PROGRESS IN HEPATITIS C TREATMENT PAIRED WITH THE LACK OF PROGRESS ON HEPATITIS B, AND THE EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON INFECTIOUS DISEASE EPIDEMIOLOGY, AMONG OTHERS. THIS IS AN ESSENTIAL RESOURCE FOR PRACTICING AND ACADEMIC PHYSICIANS, INVESTIGATORS, RESIDENTS, AND FELLOWS FOCUSED ON INFECTIOUS DISEASES, INFECTION CONTROL, PUBLIC HEALTH, AND GLOBAL HEALTH.

CHAPTER 1: PREVENTION OF HIV INFECTION.<DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>1.0 INTRODUCTION AND BACKGROUND.</DIV><DIV>1.1. GENERAL NON-PHARMACOLOGICAL MEASURES.</DIV><DIV>1.2. PREVENTION OF PERINATAL HIV TRANSMISSION.</DIV><DIV>1.2.1. BREAST-FEEDING AND HIV TRANSMISSION.</DIV><DIV>1.3. POSTEXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS FOR CUTANEOUS EXPOSURE.</DIV><DIV>1.3.1. NONHUMAN PRIMATE STUDIES.</DIV><DIV>1.3.2. POSTEXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS AFTER PERCUTANEOUS OR OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURES.</DIV><DIV>1.4. SEXUAL TRANSMISSION OF HIV AND NON-OCCUPATIONAL NEEDLE EXPOSURE.</DIV><DIV>1.4.1. BIOLOGY OF SEXUAL HIV TRANSMISSION.</DIV><DIV>1.5. EARLY ART FOR HIV INFECTION AS PREVENTION..</DIV><DIV>1.6. POSTEXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS AFTER SEXUAL EXPOSURE.</DIV><DIV>1.7. PREEXPOSURE PREVENTION OF HIV.</DIV><DIV>1.7.1. TOPICAL MICROBICIDES FOR PREP.</DIV><DIV>1.7.2. ORAL PREP IN MSM..</DIV><DIV>1.7.3. ORAL PREP IN HETEROSEXUALS AND DRUG USERS.</DIV><DIV>1.8. PROSPECTS OF FUTURE EFFECTIVE HIV VACCINE.</DIV><DIV>1.9. VIEWPOINTS AND FUTURE DIRECTION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 1.1. RISK OF HIV TRANSMISSION BY VARIOUS ROUTES.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 1.2. INDICATION FOR POSTEXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 1.3. PREEXPOSURE PREVENTATIVE MEASURES FOR HIV INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.&NBSP;&NBSP;</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 2. IMMUNE RECONSTITUTION INFLAMMATORY SYNDROME AND PARADOXICAL REACTION.</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV>2.0. INTRODUCTION.<DIV>2.1. PARADOXICAL REACTION SYNDROME.</DIV><DIV>2.2 IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.2.1. TRANSPLANT IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.2.2. BIOLOGICAL THERAPY IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.3. HIV IRIS,</DIV><DIV>2.3.1. PATHOGENESIS OF HIV IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.4.0. CLINICAL TYPES OF HIV IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.4.1. HIV TUBERCULOSIS IRIS.&NBSP;&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>2.4.2. HIV-ASSOCIATED CRYPTOCOCCAL IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.4.3. HIV-ASSOCIATED PML IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.4.4. HIV CNS IRIS WITHOUT OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>2.4.5. HIV CYTOMEGALOVIRUS IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.4.6. HIV KAPOSI SARCOMA IRIS.</DIV>2.4.7. MISCELLANEOUS HIV IRIS.<DIV>&NBSP;2.4.8. MANAGEMENT OF HIV IRIS.</DIV><DIV>2.5. DISCUSSION AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 2.1. PARADOXICAL REACTION SYNDROMES: NOT RELATED TO IMMUNOSUPPRESSION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 2.2. IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE IRIS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 2,3. HIV IRIS SUBTYPES.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 3: ISSUES IN COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA.</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>3.0. INTRODUCTION.</DIV><DIV>3.1. AIRWAY DEFENSES AND PATHOGENESIS.</DIV><DIV>3.2. MICROBIOLOGY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA.</DIV><DIV>3.2.1. COMMENTS ON MICROBIAL ETIOLOGY.</DIV><DIV>3.3. DIAGNOSIS OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA.</DIV><DIV>3.4. MARKERS OF PROGNOSIS</DIV><DIV>3.4.1. COMMENTS ON PREDICTION SCORES.</DIV><DIV>3.5. TREATMENT OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA.</DIV><DIV>3.5.1 COMMENTS ON TREATMENT.</DIV><DIV>3.6. ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY.</DIV><DIV>3.6.1. COMMENTS ON ADJUNCTIVE THERAPY.</DIV><DIV>3.7. PREVENTION</DIV>3.7.1. COMMENTS ON PREVENTION.<DIV>TABLE 3.1. CURB-65 SCORE.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 3.2. IDSA/ATS GUIDELINES FOR ICU MANAGEMENT.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.</DIV><DIV>&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 4: HELICOBACTER PYLORI INFECTION: WHEN SHOULD IT BE TREATED?</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>4.0. BACKGROUND.</DIV><DIV>4.1. TRANSMISSION.</DIV><DIV>4.2. PATHOGENESIS.</DIV><DIV>4.3. CLINICAL DISEASES AND ASSOCIATED MECHANISMS.</DIV><DIV>4.4. TREATMENT OF CLINICAL DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>4.4.1. PEPTIC ULCER DISEASE.</DIV><DIV>4.4.2. DYSPEPSIA.</DIV><DIV>4.4.3. MALT LYMPHOMA.</DIV><DIV>4.4.4. GASTRIC CANCER.</DIV><DIV>4.4.5. MISCELLANEOUS CONDITIONS.</DIV><DIV>4.5. TREATMENT REGIMENS.</DIV><DIV>4.6. PREVENTION.</DIV><DIV>4.7. COMMENTS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>FIGURE 4.1. OUTLINE OF THE PATHOGENESIS OF H. PYLORI INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>FIGURE 4.2. COURSE AND CLINICAL DISEASES OF H. PYLORI INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 4.1. DIAGNOSTIC TESTS FOR H. PYLORI INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 4.2. INDICATIONS FOR H. PYLORI TREATMENT.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 4.3. MAIN REGIMENS FOR H. PYLORI INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 5: MAJOR ADVANCES IN HEPATITIS C TREATMENT BUT NOT HEPATITIS B.</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT</DIV><DIV>5.1. INTRODUCTION.</DIV><DIV>5.2. BACKGROUND AND NATURAL HISTORY.</DIV><DIV>5.2.1. HEPATITIS B VIRUS.</DIV><DIV>5.2.2. HEPATITIS C VIRUS.</DIV><DIV>5.3. BIOLOGY AND VIROLOGY.</DIV><DIV>5.3.1. IMPACT OF GENOMIC AND STRUCTURAL DIFFERENCE ON ANTIVIRAL THERAPY.</DIV><DIV>5.3.2. HOST-VIRUS INTERACTIONS.</DIV><DIV>5.4. THERAPY FOR CHRONIC HEPATITIS B INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>5.5. THERAPY FOR CHRONIC HEPATITIS C INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>&NBSP;5.5.1. CHOOSING THE APPROPRIATE ANTIVIRAL COMBINATION.</DIV><DIV>5.5.2. MANAGEMENT OF SPECIAL POPULATIONS WITH HEPATITIS C.</DIV><DIV>5.5.3. CONTROVERSY OF ANTIVIRAL THERAPY FOR HEPATITIS C.</DIV><DIV>5.5.4. CONCERNS OF COST OF TREATING HEPATITIS C.</DIV><DIV>5.6. FUTURE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HEPATITIS B.</DIV><DIV>5.7. ISSUES IN PREVENTION OF HEPATITIS B.</DIV><DIV>FIGURE 5.1. NATURAL COURSE OF CHRONIC HEPATITIS BN INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>FIGURE 5.2. STRUCTURE AND GENOME ORGANIZATION OF HBV AND HCV.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 5.1. INDICATION OF TREATMENT OF CHRONIC HBV INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 5.2. RESPONSE TO TREATMENT IN CHRONIC HBV INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 5.3. DIRECT ANTIVIRAL AGENTS AND HCV TARGETS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 5.4. FIXED-DOSE COMBINATIONS OF DIRECT ANTIVIRAL AGENTS FOR HCV.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 5.6 PREFERRED ANTIVIRALS FOR HCV BASED ON GENOTYPES.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 6: INFECTIOUS COMPLICATIONS OF BIOLOGIC AGENTS.</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>6.0. INTRODUCTION.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>6.1. STANDARD DMARDS IMMUNE EFFECTS AND INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>6.1.1. CORTICOSTEROIDS,</DIV><DIV>6.1.2. METHOTREXATE.</DIV><DIV>6.1.3. AZATHIOPRINE.</DIV><DIV>6.1.4. CYCLOSPORINE AND CYCLOPHOSPHAMIDE.</DIV><DIV>6.2. CYTOKINES AND IMMUNE SYSTEM.</DIV><DIV>6.3. BIOLOGICAL RESPONSE MODIFIERS.</DIV><DIV>6.3.1. ANTICYTOKINES.</DIV><DIV>6.3.2. TNF BIOLOGICAL INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.3.3. IL-1 INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.3.4. IL-6 INHIBITOR.</DIV><DIV>6.3.5. IL-17 INHIBITOR.</DIV><DIV>6.3.6. IL-12/23 BLOCKADE.</DIV><DIV>6.3.7. COSTIMULATION BLOCKADE OR T-CELL ACTIVATION INHIBITOR.</DIV>6.3.9. KINASE INHIBITORS.<DIV>6.4. INFECTION ASSOCIATED WITH BIOLOGIC RESPONSE MODIFIERS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.1. INFECTIONS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS ON BIOLOGIC AGENTS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.2. INFECTIONS IN ADULT RHEUMATIC DISEASES ASSOCIATED WITH TNF-INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.3. OPPORTUNISTIC AND SPECIFIC INFECTIONS WITH BIOLOGICS IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.4. RISK OF INFECTIONS FROM BIOLOGIC AGENTS IN NON-RHEUMATIC CONDITIONS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5. OVERVIEW OF THE INFECTIOUS RISK OF DIFFERENT CLASSES OF BIOLOGICS.</DIV><DIV>6.5.1. B-CELL INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.2. BIL-1 INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.3. IL-5 INHIBITORS.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.4. IL-6 INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.5. IL-12/23 INHIBITOR.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.6. IL-17A INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.7. IG E INHIBITOR.</DIV><DIV>6.4.6.8. C5 INHIBITOR.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.9. CTLA-4 INHIBITORS</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.10. PD-1/PD-L1 INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.11. LYMPHOCYTIC FUNCTION-ASSOCIATED ANTIGEN 3 INHIBITOR.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.12. ADHESION MOLECULE INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.13. CD-19 AND CD-20 INHIBITORS</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.14. CD-52 INHIBITOR.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5. 15. S1P RECEPTOR MODULATORS.</DIV><DIV>6.4.5.16. UBIQUITIN PROTEASOME PATHWAY INHIBITORS.</DIV><DIV>6.5 NOVEL NON-BIOLOGIC AGENTS.</DIV><DIV>6.6. PREVENTION OF INFECTIONS WITH USE OF BIOLOGICAL AGENST.</DIV><DIV>6.6. CONCLUSION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 6.1. RISK OF INFECTIONS WITH STANDARD DMARDS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 6.2. INFECTIOUS RISKS OF BRMS IN RHEUMATIC AND AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 6.3. INFECTIOUS RISK OF BRMS FOR HEMATOLOGICAL AND NEOPLASTIC DISEASES AND MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 7: CLIMATE CHANGE: IMPACT ON HEALTH & INFECTIOUS DISEASES GLOBALLY.</DIV><DIV>&NBSP;ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>7.0 THE SCIENCE OF CLIMATE CHANGE.</DIV><DIV>7.1. IMPACT OF CLIMATE CHANGE,</DIV><DIV>7.2. HEALTH EFFECTS OF GLOBAL WARMING.</DIV><DIV>7.3. CLIMATE SENSITIVE DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>7.4. CLIMATE-SENSITIVE INFECTIOUS DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>7.4.1. MOSQUITO-BORNE INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>7.4.1.1. WEST NILE VIRUS.</DIV><DIV>7.4.1.2. DENGUE VIRUS AND OTHER MIMICS.</DIV><DIV>7.4.1.3. MALARIA.</DIV><DIV>7.4.1.4. LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS.</DIV><DIV>7.4.2. TICKBORNE DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>7.4.3. SANDFLY-BORNE DISEASES.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>7.4.4. CHAGAS DISEASE.</DIV><DIV>7.5. NON-VECTOR DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>7.5.1. SNAILS-RELATED DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>7.5.2. WATER-BORNE DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>7.5.3. MISCELLANEOUS CONDITIONS.</DIV><DIV>7.6. PREVENTION AND MITIGATION OF THE&NBSP; EFFECTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE.</DIV><DIV>7.7. ECONOMIC IMPACT.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 7.1. NON-INFECTIOUS DISEASES AFFECTED BY CLIMATE CHANGE.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 7.2. INFECTIOUS DISEASES AFFECTED BY CLIMATE CHANGE.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES,</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 8: BLOOD TRANSFUSION-ASSOCIATED INFECTIONS IN THE 21ST CENTURY---NEW CHALLENGES.</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT</DIV><DIV>8.0. HISTORY OF BLOOD TRANSFUSION.<BR></DIV><DIV>8.1. ADVERSE EFFECTS.</DIV><DIV>8.2. INFECTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH BLOOD PRODUCTS.</DIV><DIV>8.3. TRANSFUSION TRANSMITTED INFECTIOUS DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>8.4. RECENT TRENDS IN TRANSMITTABLE AGENTS IN BLOOD DONORS.</DIV><DIV>8.4.1. CHINA.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>8.4.2. AFRICA.</DIV><DIV>8.4.3. MIDDLE-EAST.</DIV><DIV>8.4.4. SOUTHEAST ASIA.</DIV><DIV>8.4.5. SOUTH AMERICA.</DIV><DIV>8.4.6. DEVELOPED COUNTRIES.</DIV><DIV>8.5. RISK OF TRANSFUSION-TRANSMITTED INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>8.6 RISK OF BLOOD TRANSMISSION OF SPECIFIC VIRUSES.</DIV><DIV>8.7. BACTERIAL INFECTIONS FROM BLOOD TRANSFUSION.</DIV><DIV>8.8. SUMMARY AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 8.1. SCREENING FOR TRANSFUSION-TRANSMISSIBLE INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 8.2. SELECTIVE SCREENING FOR SPECIFIC BLOOD-TRANSFUSION INFECTIONS.</DIV>TABLE 8.3. RESIDUAL RISK OF TTI IN VARIOUS REGIONS OF THE WORLD.<DIV>&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 9: MASS DRUG TREATMENT OF TROPICAL DISEASES: IS IT REALLY PROGRESS?</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>9.0. INTRODUCTION.</DIV><DIV>9.1. INTENSIFIED DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT.</DIV><DIV>9.2. MASS DRUG TREATMENT/ADMINISTRATION BACKGROUND.</DIV><DIV>9.3. SOIL TRANSMITTED HELMINTHIASIS AND MASS DRUG TREATMENT.</DIV><DIV>9.3.1.. CONCERNS OF MASS CHEMOTHERAPY FOR HELMINTHIASIS.</DIV><DIV>9.4. MASS DRUG TREATMENT OF LYMPHATIC FILARISIS.</DIV><DIV>9.4.1. VIEWPOINT OF ELIMINATION OF FILARISIS.</DIV><DIV>9.5. MASS DRUG TREATMENT OF ONCHOCERCIASIS.</DIV><DIV>9.5.1. CONCERNS WITH MDA AND CONTROL OF ONCHOCERCIASIS.</DIV>9.5.2. FUTURE DIRECTIONS FOR ELIMINATION OF ONCHOCERCIASIS.<DIV>9.5.3. MASS DRUG TREATMENT OF SCHISTOSOMIASIS.</DIV><DIV>9.5.3.1. VIEWPOINTS AND CONCERNS WITH ELIMINATION OF SCHISTOSOMIASIS.</DIV><DIV>9.6. MASS DRUG TREATMENT OF TRACHOMA.</DIV><DIV>9.6.1. CONCERNS WITH MASS DRUG TREATMENT OF TRACHOMA.</DIV><DIV>9.6.2. VIEWPOINT OF MDA FOR TRACHOMA.</DIV><DIV>9.7 MASS DRUG TREATMENT OF MALARIA.</DIV><DIV>9.7.1. CONCERNS OF MDA FOR MALARIA.</DIV><DIV>9.8. CONCLUSION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 9.1. MOST PREVALENT NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES NOT CONTROLLED BY MASS TREATMENT.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 9.2. NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES & MALARIA TREATED WITH MDA.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 9.3. COLLATERAL BENEFITS OF MASS PREVENTIVE CHEMOTHERAPY IN TROPICAL DISEASES.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 10: ISSUES IN THERAPEUTICS OF SOME BACTERIAL INFECTIONS.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>10.1. VANCOMYCIN THERAPEUTICS.</DIV><DIV>10.1.1. INTRODUCTION.</DIV><DIV>10.1.2. EXPERIENCE WITH EARLY USE OF VANCOMYCIN.</DIV><DIV>10.1.3. RELATIONSHIP OF MIC AND EFFICACY OF VANCOMYCIN.</DIV><DIV>10.1.4. PHARMACODYNAMIC AND DOSING OF VANCOMYCIN.</DIV><DIV>10.1.5. CLINICAL STUDIES ON MRSA INFECTION WITH VANCOMYCIN PHARMAQCODYNAMIC TARGETS.</DIV><DIV>10.1.6. NEPHROTOXICITY OF VANCOMYCIN.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>10.1.7. CONCLUSION ON VANCOMYCIN AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>10.2. THE NEED FOR INTRAVENOUS ANTIBIOTICS IN OSTEOMYELITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.2.1. BACKGROUND OF OSTEOMYELITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.2.2. PEDIATRIC STUDIES OF ACUTE OSTEOMYELITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.2.3. ADULT OSTEOMYELITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.2.4. BACKGROUND.</DIV><DIV>10.2.4. TREATMENT OF ADULT OSTEOMYELITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.2.5. STUDIES ON ORAL ANTIBIOTICS IN ADULT OSTEOMYELITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.2.5. SELECTION OF ORAL ANTIBIOTICS FOR TREATMENT OF OSTEOMYELITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.2.6. CONCLUSION ON ORAL ANTIBIOTICS IN BONE AND PROSTHETIC JOINTS INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>10.3. ORAL ANTIBIOTICS FOR BACTERIAL ENDOCARDITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.3.1. BACKGROUND OF INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.3.2. TREATMENT OF INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.3.3. RECENT RANDOMIZED TRIAL OF PARTIAL ORAL THERAPY IN ENDOCARDITIS.</DIV><DIV>10.3.4. CONCLUSION ON ORAL ANTIBIOTICS FOR INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>10.4. ISSUES IN THE TREATMENT S. AUREUS BACTETREMIA.</DIV><DIV>10.4.1. BACKGROUND OF S. AUREUS BACTEREMIA.</DIV><DIV>10.4.2. CONCERNS AND CONTROVERSIES IN THE MANAGEMENT OF S. AUREUS BACTETREMIA.</DIV><DIV>10.4.3. VIEWPOINT ON S. AUREUS BACTEREMIA MANAGEMENT.&NBSP;&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>TABLE 10.1. STUDIES WITH VANCOMYCIN PHARMACODYNAMICS AND OUTCOME.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 10.1.1. STUDIES ON HIGH VANCOMYCIN TROUGH LEVELS & AUC WITH NEPHROTOXICITY.</DIV><DIV>10.2. ORAL ANTIBIOTICS FOR OSTEOMYELITIS AFTER BRIEF PARENTERAL THERAPY.</DIV><DIV>10.3.1.ORAL REGIMENS USED IN THE {POET TRIAL.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.</DIV><DIV>&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 11: ISSUES AND CONCERNS IN THE MANAGEMENT OF SYSTEMIC CANDIDIASIS.</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>11.1. INTRODUCTION.</DIV><DIV>11.2. EPIDEMIOLOGY.</DIV><DIV>11. 3. PATHOGENESIS OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS.</DIV><DIV>11.4. GENETIC PREDISPOSITION OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS.</DIV><DIV>11.5. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASPECTS.</DIV><DIV>11.6. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS.</DIV><DIV>11.7. DIAGNOSIS OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS.</DIV><DIV>11.8. RESISTANT PATTERNS OF CANDIDA SPECIES IN INVASIVE DISEASE.</DIV><DIV>11.9. MANAGEMENT OF INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS.</DIV><DIV>11.9.1. CONCLUSION AND COMMENTS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 11.1. DISTRIBUTION OF CANDIDA SP. CAUSING CANDIDEMIA & SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 11.2. RELATIVE COSTS OF FLUCONAZOLE COMPARED TO ECHINOCANDINS.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 11.3. PROSPECTIVE STUDIES COMPARING EHINOCANDIN TO FLUCONAZOLE IN INVASIVE CANDIDIASIS.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV><DIV>CHAPTER 12: EMERGING AND DIFFICULT TO TREAT NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>ABSTRACT.</DIV><DIV>12.0. INTRODUCTION.</DIV><DIV>12.1. MICROBIOLOGICAL ASPECTS.</DIV><DIV>12.2. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA.</DIV><DIV>12.3. PATHOGENESIS OF INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>12.4. SPECIFIC MYCOBACTERIAL INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>12.4.1. M. AVIUM COMPLEX INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>12.4.2. CLINICAL DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH MAC.</DIV><DIV>12.4.3. SUSCEPTIBILITY TESTING AND RESISTANCE OF MAC.</DIV><DIV>12.4.4. TREATMENT OF PULMONARY MAC.&NBSP;</DIV><DIV>12.4.4.1. ISSUES AND CONTROVERSIES OF PULMONARY MAC TREATMENT.</DIV><DIV>12.4.5. TREATMENT OF DISSEMINATED MAC.</DIV><DIV>12.4.5. TREATMENT OF LOCALIZED NON-PULMONARY MAC.</DIV><DIV>12.5. MYCOBACTERIUM ASBSCESSUS INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>12.5.1. IN VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY OF M. ABSCESSUS.</DIV><DIV>12.5.2. MACROLIDE MUTATIONS AMONG M. ABSCESSUS COMPLEX.</DIV><DIV>12.5.3. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF M. ABSCESSUS INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>12.5.4. RECENT CLINICAL STUDIES ON TREATMENT OF M. ABSCESSUS INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>12.6. MYCOBACTERIUM CHIMAERA INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>12.6.1. CLINICAL ASPECTS OF INVASIVE M. CHIMAERA INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>12.6.2. DIAGNOSIS OF M. CHIMAERA INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>12.6.3. MANAGEMENT OF M. CHIMAERA INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>12.6.4. PREVENTION OF M. CHIMAERA INFECTION.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 12.1. NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA CAUSING DISEASE.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 12. 2. DISEASES AND COMMON NTM RECOVERED.</DIV>TABLE 12.3. TREATMENT OF M. AVIUM COMPLEX INFECTION.<DIV>TABLE 12.4. ANTIMICROBIALS MIC BREAKPOINTS FOR RAPIDLY GROWING MYCOBACTERIA.</DIV><DIV>TABLE 12.5. RECOMMENDED TREATMENT OF M. ABSCESSUS COMPLEX INFECTIONS.</DIV><DIV>REFERENCES.</DIV><DIV><BR></DIV>

BIOLOGIA
ENFERMEDADES INFECCIOSAS
INMUNOLOGIA
MICROBIOLOGIA
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